Niagara Weddings Archives

10847992_857048184345218_2494836143636577658_nThe 2015 fireworks happen over Niagara Falls on Fridays and Sundays during the summer at 10:00 PM.

They also occur on select holidays as follows:

  • Victoria Day (May 18, 2015)
  • Memorial Day (May 25, 2015)
  • Canada Day (July 1, 2015)
  • Independence Day (July 4, 2015)
  • Civic Holiday (August 3, 2015)0
  • Labour Day (September 7, 2015)

PLEASE NOTE: Fireworks schedule is subject to change. As always, fireworks performances are weather permitting and may be canceled due to poor weather conditions like high winds or rain.

Winter Fireworks Schedule

In the winter, fireworks over the Niagara Falls are more limited but still do occur on select days at 9:00 PM. You can view fireworks shows ongoing as part of the Niagara Falls Winter Festival of Lights Opening Ceremonies, on some Friday evenings in November and December and on Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, Boxing Day, and New Year’s Eve. The Winter Fireworks schedule and exact times and dates will be confirmed later in the year ; check back for up-to-date information.

fall18In 1827, Thomas Barnett began offering tourists a tour “Behind the Sheet” which included a walking tour to the base of the Horseshoe Falls and along a short ledge behind the falling water.

In 1887, the Niagara Falls – Queen Victoria Park Commission decided that the circular staircase leading to the “Behind the Sheet” tour at the base of the Horseshoe Falls should be replaced with a hydraulic lift.

During the spring of 1889, a major rock fall at the center of the Horseshoe Falls, diminished the flow of water over the Falls along the Canadian shore.

On June 6th 1893, the Zybach and Brundage Company were granted an exclusive ten year lease to operate the hydraulic lift, the Under the Falls attraction and photography business at the Table Rock.

In 1902, as part of the pipeline & powerhouse agreement, the Ontario Power Company agreed to build a 244 m tunnel behind the Horseshoe Falls. They were also required to construct an elevator to connect to this tunnel and provide free power for the elevator. In exchange the Ontario Power Company would take over the existing hydraulic lift to take its employees to and from their new power generating station at the base of the Falls.

The initial tunnel was built by the Ontario Power Company. By 1903, the new elevator and tunnel had been completed and ready for the tourist season. As a result, a 55 m long extension was made to the tunnel extending under the Horseshoe Falls.

In 1932, a commemorative plaque was erected to mark the site of the original Table Rock House which stood since being erected by Saul Davis in 1853. An inspection of the scenic tunnels revealed that gorge erosion had rendered the tunnels unsafe. The tunnel wall thickness had diminished to only 1.7 m between the tunnel and the gorge wall. A new tunnel was bored 18.3 m back from the former tunnel. The new tunnel was lined with concrete and electrically lighted.

In 1951, an outdoor observation platform was built at the end of a branch of the old tunnel. The Table Rock House and the starting point for this tunnel trip was the oldest building in the park. Thus, the Parks Commissioners decided to build a modern Table Rock House, which was located only a short distance south of the old Table Rock structure. This new building would allowed a full view of the Horseshoe Falls.

During 1916 as a result of WWI, the Table Rock House was closed and the military barricaded Queen Victoria Park from the Refectory to Dufferin Islands in order to protect the power generating stations. During the winter of 1916 – 1917, Table Rock House was used as headquarters for the Canadian Army. Bunk houses were built as were guard houses at the entrances to Queen Victoria Park.

Construction of the new table Rock building began in September of 1925. The architectural firm Findlay & Foulis of Sault St. Marie designed the new Table Rock House. The location of the new building required the construction of a branch tunnel to connect to the main tunnel leading to the Horseshoe Falls. The Table Rock and the Scenic Tunnels were closed to the public.

In 1963, extensive alterations were made to the Table Rock House. Again in 1989 a restoration project was started at table rock and completed in 1993.

In 2007, Table Rock finished its renovations for the newest attraction, Niagara’s Fury.

wineryRavine Vineyard Estate Winery

For 5 generations the Lowrey family has grown grapes in the soil of one of the oldest commercial vineyards in the area. Known in the past as the Upper Lowrey Farm, this family winery sits atop the ancestral Niagara River that raged 22,000 years ago crafting small-batch organic VQA wines. The result is not only great wines from our mother, Lowrey Farm, but also a wonderful lifestyle that we are eager and proud to share.

Chateau de Charmes

In 1994 Chateau des Charmes opened its new state-of-the-art winery and visitor centre. It was immediately hailed as an agri-tourism landmark. It was the first winery in Ontario purpose-built with the visitor in mind. This was long before there was a Wine Route or a winery tourism business model.

Pauls vision of a world class Niagara wine industry led by high quality estate wineries has reached fruition. Today, the vibrant Ontario industry boasts more than 150 wineries, employs more than 6000 people and receives approximately 1 million visitors each year.

Inniskillin Winery

Inniskillin was granted the first estate winery license in Canada. The Niagara Wine region is coddled and protected in the shadow of the unique natural phenomenon known as the Niagara Escarpment, a massive, geological formation, which was declared a UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve in 1990. Located at the southern tip of this 725-kilometre long ridge, the Niagara Peninsula is considered a cool climate viticulture region, as are wine regions such as Burgundy, Germany, Oregon, Tasmania and New Zealand.

Winemakers believe that, in general, cool climate viticulture regions produce lighter, fruitier wines whereas hotter regions produce less fruity, heavier wines. Wines from Niagara, along with most cooler climate regions are characteristically higher in acids and highly aromatic.

floral-clock4-2-610x4052The Floral Clock at Queenston was built by Ontario Hydro in 1950. The idea to build the attraction came from Dr. Richard Lankaster Hearn, Hydro’s General Manager and Chief Engineer at the time. While preparing for a business trip to England, Mr. Hearn was encouraged by Hugh Duncan, a Scotsman who was a maintenance electrician foreman at the Queenston Generating Station, to visit the floral clock in the Princes’ Street Gardens in Edinburgh. Dr. Hearn did as Duncan suggested, and he was very impressed by the beauty of the clock and by its practical value as an attraction.

After his trip to Scotland, Dr. Hearn commissioned Hydro’s Niagara Regional staff to design and construct a floral clock in keeping with the surroundings at the Queenston station. A “Hydro News” article, describing plans for the construction of the attraction, credits Pat Ryan and Walter Ewart as the clock’s designers. Hugh Duncan supervised construction of the attraction and was in charge of the mechanical and electrical installation work. (Dr. Hearn later served as Chairman at Ontario Hydro.)

The Edinburgh clock, built in 1903, is roughly 10 feet in diameter. In comparison, the Floral Clock is 40 feet wide, with a planted area 38 feet wide, making it one of the largest such clocks in the world. Each year, the face of the clock is filled with 15,000 to 20,000 carpet plants and colourful annuals, planted in unique, intricate designs. Since 1977 The Niagara Parks Commission Horticulture Department (now Parks Department) have been responsible for designing and planting the face of the clock, and a site maintenance worker regularly checks the official time to ensure the Clock’s accuracy.

The hands of the clock are stainless steel tubing: the hour hand is 14.5 ft, the minute hand 17.5 ft and the second hand 21 ft long. Their combined weight is 1,250 pounds. An ivy-clad, louvered stone tower stands 24 feet tall and contains speakers that every quarter hour broadcast Westminster chimes. Under the clock, accessed by a door at the rear of the tower, the concrete foundation includes three small rooms – one for the clock mechanism and its driving motor, one contains switches to supply the electrical power, and one stores the tools required for maintaining the floral face. The clock mechanism runs in a bath of oil. The mechanical workings are driven by a 5 HP DC motor supplied from a DC drive. A tachometer is mounted on the motor shaft and provides feedback to the drive to control its accuracy.

The Westminster chimes are controlled by a programmable logic controller. The sounds are simulated and are broadcast through 2-25 watt co-axial speakers mounted in the bell tower.

Adjacent to the Niagara Parks Centennial Lilac Garden, parking, washrooms and a small gift shop are provided for the convenience of the thousands of visitors who stop here each year. This floral showpiece has become one of the most photographed attractions in Niagara Parks.

The timepiece is located beside the Sir Adam Beck Generating Station No. 1, and its mechanics are still maintained by staff of Ontario Power Generation (the successor to Ontario Hydro).

Niagara Parks’ Botanical Gardens is located on the scenic Niagara Parkway and the Great Gorge, just a 10 minute drive north of the Niagara Falls. This beautiful garden setting is home to the Butterfly Conservatory and serves as the unique outdoor classroom for students attending the Niagara Parks School of Horticulture. Established in 1936, you’ll enjoy 40 hectares (99 acres) of beautifully maintained gardens. Enjoy perennials, rhododendrons, azaleas, formal parterre garden, shade, herb and vegetable plantings, as well as our world-famous rose garden featuring over 2,400 roses.

floral-clock4-2-610x4052The Floral Clock is a very popular stop on the Niagara Parkway and is photographed almost as often as the Falls! The planted face is maintained by Niagara Parks horticulture staff, while the mechanism is kept in working order by Ontario Hydro, the organization that originally built the clock. The intricate designs on the face of the timepiece are created with up to 16,000 carpet bedding plants. The floral design is changed twice each year, featuring viola in the Spring and four cultivars of Alternanthera along with green and grey forms of Santolina Sage during the Summer and Fall. California Golden Privet and Blue Festuca Grass may be used for contrast. The grounds surrounding the clock feature bedding displays and a tower at the back of the clock houses Westminster chimes that greet each quarter hour. If the door into the tower is open, you can take a glimpse at the clock mechanism and enjoy photographs that show the history of almost every face design all the way back to 1950.

At the entrance to Queenston Heights Park you will be greeted by carpet bedding displays, along with formalized annual bedding schemes that surround both the Brock and Laura Secord Monuments. Nestled high atop the Niagara Escarpment, this is the birthplace of Niagara Falls – garden and nature lovers, hikers and picnickers have used this park for generations. Facilities include two picnic pavilions, washrooms, children’s splash pad, tennis courts, a band shell, snack bar, children’s playground and fine dining at Queenston Heights Restaurant. The Park is also a terminus point of the Bruce Trail, which winds it way northward over several hundred kilometers to Tobermory. The Bruce Trail passes through the Niagara Escarpment, which has been recognized as a world biosphere by U.N.E.S.C.O. Finally, Parks Canada oversees the operation of Brock’s Monument and also has a walking tour of the historic sites associated with this important battleground.

IMG_0070The Niagara Glen is a unique spot of beauty deep in the Great Gorge that has been a designated Nature Reserve since 1992. Stairways lead to 4 km (2.5 mi) of paths that wind through a pristine pocket of Carolinian Forest, past boulders left behind as the Falls eroded through the area thousands of years ago. Visitors should be aware that hikes through the Niagara Glen involve an elevation change of over 60 m (200 ft). Proper footwear suitable for steep and rugged terrain is required. The trails are well laid out and easily negotiated if you take your time! There’s lots of interesting geology and biology to explore. The Niagara Glen is a Nature Reserve that contains wild flora and fauna (plants and animals). Please observe all posted regulations, stay on trails that are marked and follow generally accepted trail etiquette. Fires are not permitted ake only photos, leave only footprints! The Niagara Glen overlooks the Niagara River Whirlpool, a unique natural phenomenon that you must see to believe! Thousands of years ago, as the Niagara River slowly eroded its way through the Niagara Escarpment, creating the Great Gorge, a right-angle turn in the river’s path forced the rushing water into a deep counter-clockwise spin.

winery Niagara-on-the-Lake, often called the loveliest town in Ontario, has a long and distinguished history. Stroll back through history and enjoy world class theatre, fine dining, shopping, our estate wineries, farm markets and historical sites. Site of the old Neutral Indian village of Onghiara, it was settled at the close of the American Revolution by Loyalists coming to Upper Canada, many of whom had been members of the much feared Butler’s Rangers based during the American Revolution at Fort Niagara, then under British control. In 1781 the British Government purchased land from the Mississaugas; a strip of land 6 miles wide along the western bank of the Niagara River for “300 suits of clothing”.

By 1782, 16 families had become established and had cleared 236 acres. In 1791 part of the military reserve at the mouth of the river was chosen as the future townsite. In 1792, Newark – as it was named by Governor Simcoe, became the first capital of the newly-created colony of Upper Canada, and the legislature met here for five sessions, until Lieutenant-Governor John Graves Simcoe moved the capital to York. By 1796, 70 new homes were built, and the town continued to prosper as the economic, administrative and judicial centre for the Niagara Peninsula. The physical appearance of the town, with the exception of the powder magazine at Fort George was virtually erased by the burning of the town by the Americans during the war of 1812.

Rebuilt, Niagara became an active commercial centre, with a busy shipping and ship-building industry, as well as many shops and warehouses. The beautiful old homes lining the tree-shaded streets attest to the prosperity of its citizens.

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